Psychoactives

Oakland Votes Unanimously to Decriminalize Natural Psychedelics

KTLA:

Oakland City Council voted Tuesday to become the first U.S. city to decriminalize the adult use and possession of psychoactive plants like ayahuasca and peyote, and the second to make the same move for hallucinogenic mushrooms.

The resolution makes the adult use and possession of all entheogenic, or psychoactive, plants and fungi the lowest priority for police. That means, along with psilocybin mushrooms, it applies to cacti like peyote, the shrub iboga that has been used to treat opioid dependence and a variety of plants used to brew ayahuasca, among other things.

Huge news out of Oakland late last night.


Oakland Lawmakers Advance Psychedelic Decriminalization Measure

Chris Roberts, writing for Marijuana Moment:

The City Council’s Public Safety Committee voted—with three ayes and one abstention—to advance to the full Council a measure that would declare enforcement of laws prohibiting the possession of “entheogenic plants” among adults the “lowest priority” for police.

The measure would also seek to block officials from using “any city funds or resources to assist” in enforcing bans on naturally derived psychedelics.

If the resolution sponsored by City Councilmember Noel Gallo is enacted, Oakland would follow Denver—where voters narrowly approved a psilocybin decriminalization measure earlier this month—in declaring its support for allowing adults to possess certain psychedelics without fear of arrest, fines and imprisonment.

With last night’s victory, Oakland is now one step closer to decriminalizing multiple natural psychedelics in one fell swoop. The resolution will go in front of the full city council next Tuesday. If approved, the city will join the small list of other places in America (New Mexico, Louisiana, and Denver) that have decriminalized natural psychedelics in some shape or form.


TSA Updates Marijuana Rules to Allow Hemp-Derived CBD on Flights

Kyle Jaeger, writing for Marijuana Moment:

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) updated its policy on cannabis over the Memorial Day weekend, changing the medical marijuana section of its “What Can I Bring?” webpage from reading “no” to “yes” (with “special instructions”).

Specifically, the agency is clarifying that hemp-derived CBD products may now be carried on planes under certain circumstances.

Hemp-derived CBD is now allowed on flights “as long as it is produced within the regulations defined by the law under the Agriculture Improvement Act 2018.”


Oakland Council May Board Magic Bus by Decriminalizing Natural Psychedelics

Erin Allday and Sarah Ravani, writing for San Francisco Chronicle:

Oakland could become the second city in the country to decriminalize certain natural psychedelics — including “magic mushrooms” — if elected leaders approve a resolution that would instruct law enforcement to stop investigating and prosecuting people using the drugs.

The resolution is scheduled for its first public hearing before the City Council’s public safety committee Tuesday night and could go before the full council as early as June 4. It applies only to psychedelics that come from plants or fungi, not synthetic drugs like LSD or MDMA, also known as ecstasy.

Less than a month after Denver voted to decriminalize psilocybin mushrooms, another U.S. city is on the verge of decriminalizing natural psychedelics. Decriminalize Nature Oakland is the education campaign leading the charge to decriminalize several entheogenic plants, fungi, and natural sources in Oakland, CA:

  • Mushrooms

  • Cacti

  • Iboga-containing plants

  • Extracted combinations of plants similar to Ayahuasca

The definition of “natural psychedelics” will be limited to those containing either indole amines, tryptamines, or phenethlamines.

It’s been amazing watching the psychedelic legalization movement winning recently. Now the million dollar question is, “Will Oakland be able to keep the streak going?”


Berlin Park Designates ‘Pink Zone’ Areas for Drug Dealers

Kate Connolly, writing for The Guardian:

Drug dealers in Berlin are to be given designated spaces in a city centre park to carry out transactions, leading to criticism that authorities have capitulated to criminal gangs.

For years there has been a heated debate about Görlitzer Park, a popular meeting point in the trendy southern Berlin district of Kreuzberg, which has been attracting an ever increasing number of drug dealers. Local people said they were reluctant to let children and pets roam free there.

After repeated attempts by police to clear the dealers failed, the park manager declared areas where they should be allowed to operate, identified by spray-painted pink boxes.

Cengiz Demirci said the pink zones would mean that visitors to the park – known locally as Görli – were no longer intimidated by groups of dealers, typically men operating in gangs, who crowd the entrance.

What a peculiar approach.